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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be released into the environment and wind up in the food chain. >> conducting chemical analysis will not help me if there is poisonous stuff flying around in the air. or finding its way into the groundwater. >> there is a tradition of mining in the area. 2000 years ago, the romans mind for goals here. it is thought to have one of the biggest gold deposits in western europe. mining here is lucrative, even if the excavation is costly environmental regulations strict. the people are divided on the issue. some residents are banding together to raise support for the mine. the mother of this young family is one of them. like 40% of the population, she is out of work. >> i hope that thanks to the mine, we will be able to stay and our family will have a future here. otherwise, we will have to move away. >> but where to? the effects of the economic crisis are being felt across spain. in this region, there is little industry outside of traditional coal mining, and its days are numbered. the regional government could sorely use the tax revenue the gold mine would generate. the socialist-led government d
question. germany's environment minister believe so, but he says the country has to completely rethink the way it subsidizes renewals. >> with elections due next year, the rising cost of electricity has become an issue. environment minister is calling for a government overhaul of renewable energy. he says current policy favors quantity, not quality. >> we need the appropriate instruments to ensure that the expansion of renewable energy takes place in a steady and predictable fashion, and we want to make renewals competitive on the energy market as soon as possible -- we want to make renewables competitive on the energy market as soon as possible. >> he is also calling on a time line on phasing out government subsidies, and he wants to regulate the pace of the grid, but in germany's greens say the cost of switching to renewable resources are being unfairly distributed. >> stay with us. when we come back, the international community marking the very first girls' state. we will see how schoolgirls in pakistan are showing their support for the 14-year-old activist shot by the taliban. -- m
cells in the body sense their environment. members of the royal swedish academy of sciences in stockholm made the announcement on wednesday. robert lefkowitz from howard hughes institute and brian kobilka won the prize. they have independently studied how human body cells can sense their environment and discovered that a family of proteins later named g-protein coupled receptors, send signals to the cells. >>> turkey's military commanders are wrapping up their reinforcements along the border with syria. they've sent at least 25 more fighter jets to the area. the build-up of troops and weapons is adding to fears that the fighting in syria could escalate into a regional conflict. turkish forces have fired artillery into syria for six straight days now. they're responding to mortars that have come from the syrian side. the tension at the border began when a mortar fired from inside syria hit a turkish town. five civilians died. turkish military commanders say they've deployed 25 f-16 fighter jets to a base near the border. the military's also reinforcing its troops and moving gun batteries
environment is destroyed, then it is really bad, and not just for our own investment, but for the area in general. at the beginning, i thought i would get involved in the fight against it, that i would not go along with it, but now, i am having my doubts. i wonder whether things are not better as they stand and if i would be better off moving away. >> of course, that is not with this conservationist wants, but more and more manor houses on her map are marked in pink, indicating that they are in serious condition. >> recently, one of the manor houses had disappeared completely. there was just a heap of stones. i fear that in the next five or 10 years, and aiding houses will be beyond repair. >> it could soon be dotted with ruins, ruins with a certain melancholic charm for sure, but hardly evidence of the prosperity that east germans were promised after unification. >> that brings us to the end of this edition of "european journal" from dw studios in brussels. from all of us here, thanks very much for watching. until next nine -- until next time, bye for now! captioned by the national ca
on the environment. croatia is also involved in the analysis. when we get all the data, croatia and bosnia-herzegovina will decide whether to realize the project. >> but a preliminary decision has already been made. the environmentalists say that water could be pumped out of this marshland. earlier this month, bosnia's republics signed an agreement with croatia to build three more power stations. environmentalists and farmers on both sides of the border are worried about the future. the environmentalists are united in their campaign to stop the power stations. such unity is something rare in this very divided region. coming up, dw are down at the frankfurt book fair where some celebrities have made an appearance. >> first, other stories making news around the globe. the german president has visited the czech capital of prague, highlighting the reconciled relationship between his country and the czech republic. he said he felt respect for the not see occupation -- -- respect for their recovery from the nazi occupation. >> germany has a high proportion of citizens over 65 while just 13% of t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)